Life in Armenian Cities of Turkey (+Photo)

Life in Armenian Cities of TurkeyIn the past, the city of Mush, which is now located in Turkey, was a major Armenian center. At the beginning of the 20th century, more than ten thousand Armenians lived there.

By 2015, that is, exactly 100 years after the Armenian Genocide, almost all ancient buildings were demolished as the Turkish government have been actively building up these territories.

Nevertheless, the few local Armenians are trying to preserve the traditions of their ancestors.

Photographers Anahit Hayrapetyan (Armenia) and Serra Akcan (Turkey) observed how people live in Mush and another area nearby, Sason, in March-April 2015.

• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. A Muslim woman stands in the doorway of her house, which is built from the stones of the Surb Karapet monastery destroyed in 1915.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. A local resident holds a portrait of his father, who had to escape the Ottoman Empire in 1915.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. Mush.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. The village of Parshenk in the Sason region. In 1914, 155 Armenians lived there.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. Siranush, “During the day, we hid in caves, and at night, we returned home. We were afraid of everyone who saw us.”
• Photo by Serra Akcan. The historical part of Mush being build up under the authorities. Over the past couple of years, 500 old buildings were destroyed.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. Armenians who were converted to Islam in the village of Norshen, where in 1914, there were about 2150 Armenians.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. Merife, “Armenians lived here, but now, they are all gone or dead.”
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. Kurdish woman with a child in the Armenian church, city of Diyarbakir. Turkish authorities restored the church in order to establish relations with the Christian community.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. City of Sason.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. Confectionery in Mush.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. Mush city center.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. Local resident Cemil with his wife, the village of Komk.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. View of Mush.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. Bitlis.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. Hikmet, “We left our village 70 years ago. Only God knows what happened there afterwards.”
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. In the village of Cengili, most of the houses are built from the stones of the monastery Surb Karapet destroyed in 1915.
• Photo by Serra Akcan. Armenians who were converted to Islam in the village of Norschen.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. Citizen of Mush.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. Mountains of Sason.
• Photo by Anahit Hayrapetyan. A resident of Chingeli village.


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