The Heritage of the Kingdom of Van

The Heritage of the Kingdom of Van

During excavations of the fortress city of Erebuni in the early 70s, silver bowls with figures of a warrior and a horse were discovered along with a bronze cauldron lid with a small handle in the shape of a flowering pomegranate.

According to archaeologists, these finds belong to the era of the Van Kingdom (6th century BC). Today, the bowls are kept in the Erebuni Museum, while the bronze lid is kept in the National Historical Museum of Armenia.

Other noteworthy finds from the Erebuni fortress were wall paintings, murals, and prints of ancient seals.

According to researchers, such murals were widespread in Mesopotamia. However, unlike the ancient cities of the Middle East, the frescoes and murals from Erebuni are better preserved. Today, these miraculously preserved wall paintings make Erebuni a unique art monument of the Ancient East.

At the Karmir Blur hill, archaeologists have discovered well-preserved bronze and iron warrior belts. Back in the days, such belts have been worn not only as part of military uniforms but also as a religious accessory that provided protection from dark forces.

As for other finds, fragments of the preserved chain mail of Argishti I were discovered in Teishebaini. Now, they are presented in the Erebuni Museum.

At the end of the 19th century, inhabitants of the city of Van found fragments of the ancient throne of the kings of the period of the Van Kingdom. These fragments were made of gilding and bronze in the form of winged animals and deities, and their faces were decorated with precious stones.

Unfortunately, the fragments aren’t preserved in their original appearance. All the gems on the fragments of the throne have been broken or stolen.

Finally, we have three quivers that have belonged to King Sarduri II. Today, one of them is in the State Hermitage, while the other two are in the National History Museum of Armenia. Note that on the surfaces of the bronze quivers are the images of the soldiers of the Kingdom of Van.




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