Category «Antiquities»

Zenobia, Queen of Greater Armenia, in European Works of Art

Zenobia, Queen of Greater Armenia

A number of famous European artists of the 17-19th centuries dedicated numerous paintings to Queen Zenobia of Armenia (1st century AD). Aside from that, she was featured in several operas. For example, composer George Frideric Handel wrote the opera Radamisto where the main characters of the opera were the rulers of Greater Armenia who lived …

Aratta in Sumerian Mythology

Aratta in Sumerian Mythology

The ancient state of Aratta is identified with the Cucuteni–Trypillia culture. According to another point of view, “Aratta” is distorted “Ararat” or “Urartu.” Researchers have also proposed identifying a Sanskrit toponym mentioned in the Mahabharata and other texts with Aratta. In Sumerian literature, Aratta is described as follows: “Wisdom and art ‘descended’ from the country …

Joscelin II, Count of Edessa

Joscelin II of Edessa (1113 – 1159) was the last ruling count of the county of Edessa. He was the son of Armenian princess Beatrice and Count Joscelin I. During the battle of Azaz in 1125, Joscelin was taken hostage by Muslims. Soon, through the efforts of the King of Jerusalem Baldwin II, he was …

Tigran Yervanduni – Rulers of Ancient Armenia

Tigran Yervanduni – Rulers of Ancient Armenia

Tigran Yervanduni was the son and heir of Yervand I Sakavakyats (“short-staying”, reigned in 570-560 BC). Tigran reigned in 560-535 BC. He was a hunting companion to the founder of Achaemenid Persia Cyrus the Great. Tigran was the one to kill the king of Media Azhdahak. During his reign, the territory of Armenia also spread …

Cilician Armenian Coins – King Hethum, 1226-1270

Cilician Armenian Coins

The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia was a feudal kingdom that existed from 1080 to 1375. The inhabitants of Cilicia were very freedom-loving and only nominally obeyed the Persians, Seleucids, and from 63 BC the Romans. The Romans kept in submission only the plain of Cilicia. The Cilicians have always been distinguished by their courage and …

Tir – God of Written Language of Ancient Armenia

Tir – God of Written Language

In the Armenian pantheon, Tir was a god of writing, sciences, arts, a scribe of the chief deity Aramazd, and a diviner of fate. Tir brought dreams to people, revealing their future to them. In the temple of Tir (between the cities of Vagharshapat and Artashat), the priests interpreted these dreams. Besides, they taught sciences …

Oshakan Monastery – Ashtarak, Armenia

Oshakan Monastery – Ashtarak, Armenia

Oshakan is a village 3 km southeast of the town of Ashtarak. According to a legend, Noah and his family descended from the top of Mount Masis (Ararat) and saw Oshakan freed from the water. At its sight, they exclaimed “Oshakan,” which roughly translates as “Marvel for the eyes.” Located within the estates of Arshakids …

The Origins of Astronomical Knowledge – Petroglyphs of Armenia

The Origins of Astronomical Knowledge

One theory claims that the most ancient centers of astronomical knowledge were the territories of Armenia and Asia Minor. Prominent historians and astronomers concluded that people who divided the sky into constellations have lived between 36 and 42 degrees of northern latitude. According to English astronomer Olcott, people who invented the ancient figures of the …

Vishap in the Myths of Ancient Armenia

Vishap in the Myths of Ancient Armenia

Vishaps in Armenian mythology were dragons, chthonic creatures. They were represented in a zoomorphic (most often in the form of a snake) or anthropomorphic appearance and personified thunderstorms, tornadoes, or thunderclouds. According to myths, the big Vishap absorbed the sun, causing an eclipse. Vishaps lived in high mountains, in large lakes, in the sky, in …