Category «Culture»

New Anthology in German Looks at Genocide Aftermath

New Anthology in German Looks at Genocide Aftermath

BERLIN — On September 21 Armenians throughout the world celebrated 30 years of independence for the Republic of Armenia. In official venues, like the Armenian Embassy in Berlin, the event was commemorated in the presence of public figures from political life. It was an occasion to reflect on 1991 and to cast a glance to …

In One of the World’s Oldest Winemaking Regions, a New Generation Revives an Ancient Tradition

In One of the World’s Oldest Winemaking Regions, a New Generation Revives an Ancient Tradition

An Armenian wine expert highlights the best places to experience the rebirth of a wine culture stifled under Soviet rule Ancient accounts have long acknowledged Armenia as a cradle of winemaking. The eighth-century BC kings of Urartu referred to ancient Armenia as “the land of the vineyards” and Assyrian armies marveled at its vast quantities of fruit trees …

A Photographer Documents the Shifting Landscapes of Armenia

A Photographer Documents the Shifting Landscapes of Armenia

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the small, landlocked country of Armenia has been in a constant state of sociopolitical flux. None of the elections in this young republic have been considered free and fair; in 1999, Prime Minister Vazgen Sargsyan was assassinated, along with several other parliamentary leaders; roughly a third of the Armenian population lives in poverty; and …

The Family Keepsakes Saved From Genocide

The Family Keepsakes Saved From Genocide

A photograph series asks the Midwestern descendants of survivors of the Armenian Genocide to show the items that were saved from the events of 1915. The story of survival has unfortunately become a popular leitmotif of modern biographies and communities. The violence of social upheavals during the modern era has generated an endless stream of …

The Rock Tomb of Kapilikaya

The Rock Tomb of Kapilikaya

The rock tomb of Kapilikaya (kaya/kala/kara – “stone” in Armenian) is located in Kirkdilim, 27 km north of Corum, Turkey․ It is thought to be a tomb of the Hellenistic period, dating back to approximately the 2nd century B.C.Rising above a gentle stream, a steep trail winds up the left side of the rock outcropping …

Komitas – BBC Music Magazine

Komitas - BBC Music Magazine

Who is Armenia’s greatest composer? Many would say Aram Khachaturian – for what other Armenian composer has the rest of the world even heard of? Yet ask the same question of any Armenian, and you will probably hear the name Komitas. Who was the composer Komitas? Komitas, too, was an Armenian composer, albeit of a different …

Shushi’s Occupied Museums

Shushi’s Occupied Museums

On November 10, 2020, Azerbaijan seized ancestral Armenian lands in the democratic Republic of Artsakh following an unprovoked military offensive launched on September 27. Today, Azerbaijan controls the majority of the ethnically Armenian enclave, which has been populated by Indigenous Armenians since at least the 2nd century BCE, according to written records As many museums …

An Artist Draws From the Erasure of Armenian Art and History

An Artist Draws From the Erasure of Armenian Art and History

French artist Pascal Convert, known for his commitment to cultural heritage, utilized recovered khachkars to create drawings and prints about destroyed Armenian heritage. ARIS — Earlier this year, Hyperallergic featured a lengthy article by researchers Simon Maghakyan and Sarah Pickman that exposed the destruction of Armenian historical monuments by the Azerbaijan government in the Nakhichevan region (though …

Can Islamic Shrines’ Connection to Armenians Transform Azerbaijani Politics of Erasure?

Can Islamic Shrines’ Connection to Armenians Transform Azerbaijani Politics of Erasure?

An Islamic mausoleum built by an Armenian architect might offer a unique opportunity to embrace diversity. Last fall’s war in the South Caucasus, during which Azerbaijan violently procured most of its Soviet-era territories, has left many wondering whether the continued erasure of the region’s Indigenous Armenian cultural monuments can be prevented. While the haughty Azerbaijani government’s rhetoric and record could hardly …

Unique Folk Art Recreates the World Before the Armenian Genocide

Unique Folk Art Recreates the World Before the Armenian Genocide

At the Armenian Museum of America, a small collection of dioramas reveals a world that was left behind during the genocide. In the Armenian Museum of America, there’s a curious collection of dioramas that might represent one of the most unique forms of Armenian-American folk art. On the first floor of the Watertown, Massachusetts-based museum is …

Iran, Stamp dedicated to the Monastery of St. Thaddeus

Iran, Stamp dedicated to the Monastery of St. Thaddeus

TEHRAN –In conjunction with the opening of a joint exhibition of selected Iranian and Armenian stamps organized by the Artak Manukian Museum and the Iranian National Postal Service’s Public Relations office, the First Day ceremonies of a stamp dedicated to the Monastery of St. Thaddeus was held earlier this year. Present at the event were …

Armenia’s Love to Shakespeare by Zabelle Boyajian

Armenia’s Love to Shakespeare by Zabelle Boyajian

On the occasion of the 300th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death on April 23, 1916, Zabelle Boyajian, an English-Armenian writer, translator, painter, and Shakespeare enthusiast, participated in one of the many commemorative festivals taking place that day and recited her personal ode to the Bard, titled “Armenia’s Love to Shakespeare.” It should have been a …

French-Armenian painter Zareh Moutafian

French-Armenian painter Zareh Moutafian

French-Armenian artist Zareh Moutafian, born March 15, 1907 / He subsequently became a prolific art critic. He owns the saying: “Armenianized the sea”, in which he meant the work of Ivan Aivazovsky. Moutafian was 8 years old when his family was massacred in the Black Sea town of Unye. He was left for dead, and found …