Category «Mythology»

Light and Darkness – The Holy Traditions of Ararat

Light and Darkness

The gods ruled the universe. Everyone did their job. Then, everyone would gather on Earth, on Ararat, to have fun, to enjoy divine pleasures seasoned with grape wine. In these feasts would also take part Arius, the gods’ earthly brother. Frisky and cheerful was Arius. He loved the gods, and the gods loved him. The …

Birth of Arius – The Holy Traditions of Ararat

Birth of Arius

Once, Mother of Gods Anahit was walking around Ararat. The sun was setting behind the mountains and was gathering its rays. But one small ray was in no hurry to leave Ararat. Playing with flowers, it did not notice the setting of the Sun and forgot that it was time for sleep. Suddenly, the Sun …

God Vahagn – Legends of Ancient Armenia

God Vahagn – Legends of Ancient Armenia

In Armenian myths, Vahagn was the god of thunder and lightning. He was born in the agonized heaven and earth and the purple sea. Red reed which spewed smoke and fire was also involved in his birth. From the flame appeared Vahagn, a young man with fiery hair, a fiery beard, and eyes like two …

Goddess Nane – Legends of Ancient Armenia

Goddess Nane – Legends of Ancient Armenia

In Armenian mythology, goddess Nane or Nanea was the daughter of the supreme deity Aramazd. It is assumed that Nane in Akkadian culture is represented as goddess Nanaya. The cult of Nane seems to be intertwined with the cult of mother goddess Anahit. Nane was also revered as the Great Mother (in the Armenian language, …

Tsovinar – Legends of Ancient Armenia

Tsovinar – Legends of Ancient Armenia

In Armenian myths, Tsovinar or Tsovyan (“marine”) was the spirit of thunderstorm and the personification of lightning. Tsovinar was a wrathful woman galloping on a fiery horse in the clouds during thunderstorms. She sent people life-giving rain or deleterious hail. In the Armenian epos “Sasna Tsrer” (“Daredevils of Sasun”), Tsovinar was the mother of twins …

Goddess Astghik – Legends of Ancient Armenia

Goddess Astghik – Legends of Ancient Armenia

In Armenian mythology, Astghik (“little star”) was the goddess of love and water and the beloved of god Vahagn. Her main temple in Ashtishat (north of the modern city of Mush in Western Armenia) was called the “bedroom of Vahagn.” Sometimes, the goddess of fertility, love, and water in Armenian pantheon was referred to as …

The Legend of Lake Parvana

The Legend of Lake Parvana

The story of the cartoon “The Legend of Lake Parvana” tells of an Armenian kingdom whose ruler fell seriously ill. He understood that his days were numbered so he tried to find his only daughter a good husband. Throughout the kingdom, messengers were sent with the news that a large-scale pre-marital screening was to take …

Legends of Tatev Monastery

Legends of Tatev Monastery

Tatev Monastery (built in 906) was one of the main spiritual, political, and cultural centers of medieval Armenia. During its existence, it has served as a fortress, the residence of the metropolitan, and a university. For 1108 years, the monastery has crowned the triangular plateau near the village of Tatev in the province of Syunik. …

The Victor Pomegranate Tree – Legends of Armenia

The Victor Pomegranate Tree

An Armenian legend says that on the last day of summer, an extraordinary contest took place in the glittering luxury of the palace of father-god Aramazd. All the fruits and berries of the land of Armenia – grapes, apricot, peach, apple, pear, cherry, plum, quince – gathered in it. The judges were the mighty pagan …

Tamerlane and Geghard Monastery – The Legend of the Spear of Destiny

Tamerlane and Geghard Monastery

A 14th-century Turco-Mongol conqueror Tamerlane has achieved outstanding military success, conquering vast territories. However, he was yet to conquer Armenia. And thereby, he decided to invade this country of mountains. Upon arriving at the Garni Gorge, Tamerlane ordered to set up a camp and sent scouts to investigate the surroundings. In the morning, one of …

Armenian Traces in Scandinavian Mythology

Armenian Traces in Scandinavian Mythology

In 1222 – 1225, Icelandic historian, poet, and politician Snorri Sturluson wrote his book “Edda” consisting of Scandinavian myths and tales. This book has long been considered a fruit of the author’s mind, having no historical basis. However, in 1643, Icelandic bishop Sveinsson discovered an ancient manuscript with songs about deities and heroes that strongly …