Biased Distortions of History by Editors and Translators

Biased Distortions of History by Editors and Translators

David Marshall Lang (6 May 1924 – 20 March 1991), a professor of Caucasian Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London, has been one of the most productive British scholars specializing in the history of ancient Armenia, Georgia, and Bulgaria. It appears that the translations of his books into Russian …

Arakha – The Last Babylonian King – Armenian Rebel

Armenian Rebel Arakha - The Last Babylonian King

The last independent Babylonian king was an Armenian named Arakha, also known as Nebuchadnezzar IV. After the conquest of Babylon by the Achaemenid Empire in 539 BC, Babylonians attempted to rebel against their Persian conquerors several times. The first rebellion was led by Nidintu-Bêl, but it was violently suppressed by Darius the Great. The very …

The Oldest Calendar – (AOC AND AFC)

The Oldest Calendar - (AOC AND AFC)

In Armenia the Solar Calendar was in use for all times. And this is understandable because the Sun was the Main God. There is no data that the Moon calendar was ever used, although it was known and the Moon period of rotation around Earth was not difficult to measure. Prehistoric astronomers looking through any …

Spread of Agriculture from a Genetic Standpoint

Spread of Agriculture from a Genetic Standpoint

Recent genetic studies demonstrated that Neolithic farming spread from Armenian population into Europe. For example, haplogroup G features its highest diversity among Armenians, indicating that it originated with Armenians before spreading to Caucasus and Europe. Along with J2 clades, haplogroup G has been associated with the spread of agriculture in Europe in particular. The haplogroup …

A Story of Tigran Yervanduni and His Wife Armenuhi

A Story of Tigran Yervanduni and His Wife Armenuhi

Armenians have always highly appreciated Armenian women, being ready to sacrifice anything for them. A vivid example of this deep respect is the story of Armenian King Tigran Yervanduni (reigned between 560 – 535 BC), son of Yervand (Orontes) I Sakavakyats, and his wife. Various historical accounts testify that Tigran was a close ally of …

Ancient Belowground Cities of Cappadocia

Ancient Belowground Cities of Cappadocia

Now partly occupying the territory of historical Armenia, Turkey would be glad to destroy every single mention of Armenians. Fortunately, they are not able to do that yet. Representatives of many countries participate in archaeological excavations carried out in the territory of Turkey, preventing them from directly wiping out Armenian artifacts. But alas, they have …

Karahunj – Stone Astronomical Instrument

Karahunj - Stone Astronomical Instrument

All Stones with Holes, single ones or groups of 2 or 3 Stones (including also some stones without holes) are the unique Astronomical Instruments for different observations of celestial sources: the Sun, the Moon, stars, planets and others. To project, build and use such stable and accurate instruments for different scientific purposes it was necessary …

The Skhtorashen Plane Tree, Tnjri – Artsakh

The Skhtorashen Plane Tree, Tnjri - Artsakh

Not far from the Skhtorashen village in the Martuni district of Artsakh rises a great plane tree of 2035 years of age. Among ancient cultures, plane trees were considered “trees of life”. This particular tree is the oldest and tallest tree not only in Armenia but in former Soviet republics as well. The Skhtorashen plane …

The Legend of Duduk – Armenian Legends

The Legend of Duduk – Armenian Legends

Once flying over the mountains, Young Wind noticed a beautiful tree, likes of which he had never seen before. He was enchanted by it. Touching the teeth of the tree’s leaves, he extracted wonderful melodies spreading far around. When Supreme Wind learned about this, he cast his anger upon the mountains, destroying almost the whole …

How Armenian “Pakhlava” Became Turkish “Baklava”

How Armenian “Pakhlava” Became Turkish “Baklava”

In Eastern Armenian, baklava is called pakhlava while in Western Armenian, it is called bakhlava. The Turkish language doesn’t have the “kh” sound, so “bakhlava” became “baklava”. This name was then adopted by other languages and peoples. Baklava was patented in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Let’s see what the history of the city is. …

The Armenian-Torq Angegh, Basque-Torq, Tocharian-Torqu, Sumerian-Tor

The Armenian-Torq Angegh, Basque-Torq, Tocharian-Torqu, Sumerian-Tor

In Armenian, “tor” has two meanings – grandchild (with “torq” being the plural form), and rain. In Artsakh dialect, “tora kyalis (galis)” means “it is raining”. Interestingly, “tu(o)r” in Sumerian also means “rain”. The cuneiform symbol for “tor (tur)” is used to denote either its syllabic usage or the sign’s Sumerograms. It is used in …

The Great Flood Before Bible – The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Great Flood Before Bible – The Epic of Giglamesh

Being of Armenic or Armenid extraction, the Sumerians created one of the very first centers of civilization in the lower regions of Mesopotamia. Many scholars accept that Sumerians initially inhabited the Armenian Highlands before gradually descending first to Northern Mesopotamia and then further south. During their migration, Sumerians established cities of Ur (excavated by Sir …