Tushpa – World History Encyclopedia

Tushpa - World History Encyclopedia

Tushpa (Tosp), later known as Van, was the capital of the Urartu kingdom of ancient Armenia, eastern Turkey, and western Iran from the 9th to 6th century BCE. Located on the eastern shore of Lake Van in modern Turkey, the city was a fortress site which was reused as a provincial capital under the Achaemenian Empire and then, once again, made the capital …

Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philorhomaios Philhellen

Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philorhomaios Philhellen

Antiochus I Theos Dikaios Epiphanes Philorhomaios Philhellen (Ancient Greek: Ἀντίοχος ὁ Θεὸς Δίκαιος Ἐπιφανὴς Φιλορωμαῖος Φιλέλλην, meaning “Antiochos, the just, eminent god, friend of Romans and friend of Greeks After this overblown introduction of himself (we get it, he was friends with everyone) let me introduce Antiochus I, king of Commagene Between 70 BC and …

The Armenian Language: Answers Of A Linguist

The Armenian Language: Answers Of A Linguist

Armenians who are not linguists are often under the incorrect impression that there are only two possibilities for Armenian origins: either Armenian is the only Indo-European language who stayed in place or Armenian is descendant from Phrygian, following Herodotus’s claim that Armenians were Phrygian colonists. Yet, mainstream historical linguists are convinced by neither position. It …

Teishebaini – World History Encyclopedia

Teishebaini - World History Encyclopedia

Teishebaini (aka Tesebaini, modern Karmir-Blur, near Yerevan, Armenia) was an important fortress city of the Urartu civilization and excavations at the site, largely undisturbed since its abandonment c. 590 BCE, have provided an invaluable insight into the daily life of the region during the Bronze and Iron age of the 9th to 6th century BCE. With huge walls, large storerooms, granaries, wine and beer vats, along with …

From the Forgotten Pages of History: Zabelle Boyajian, an Ambassador of Armenian Culture

Zabelle Catherine Boyajian (1872-1957) was an artist, writer, translator and activist and one of the most successful and well known British-Armenian intellectuals of her time. A woman famous for her articles on Armenian literature in British magazines, the first “eastern woman” artist to be exhibited in Europe, an author of books and numerous paintings. Zabelle …

Roman Emperor Nero Crowned Tiridates I Of Armenia

Roman Emperor Nero Crowned Tiridates I Of Armenia

Tiridates I was the King of Armenia beginning in 53 AD and the founder of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia. He reigned from 52-58 AD, then again from 62-88 AD. The coronation of Tiridates I of Armenia In 66 AD, the Armenian king Tiridates, who had been unable to overcome Roman and homegrown resistance in …

Why Did The Mongols Invade Armenia?

Why Did The Mongols Invade Armenia?

Throughout history, Armenia has seen periods of absolute independence but it has also been invaded by many peoples, such as the Parthians, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Mongols and Turkic tribes. The Mongol  Empire existed during the 13th and 14th centuries and was the largest contiguous land empire in history. At some point in the 13th century, …

The Queens of Urartu – Queens of Armenia

The Queens of Urartu - Queens of Armenia

History, especially ancient & medieval, usually chose men to be its heroes. Women tend to be held in the background. Armenian history is not any different in that respect, even though there are records of women playing a significant part. Because Armenia for a majority of its existence has been ruled by kings,  history has …

Urartu Civilization – World History Encyclopedia

Urartu Civilization - World History Encyclopedia

Urartu, also known as the Kingdom of Urartu or the Kingdom of Van, was a civilization which developed in the Bronze and Iron Age of ancient Armenia, eastern Turkey, and northwestern Iran from the 9th century BCE. Controlling territories through military might and the construction of fortresses, the kingdom boasted a lively production in the arts, especially metalwork. Surviving only two centuries, the …

Khor Virap – World History Encyclopedia

Khor Virap - World History Encyclopedia

Khor Virap is a monastery located in Armenia that was first established in 642 CE. Its name is derived from “virap nerk’in,” which means “deep dungeon” in Armenian. Khor Virap is one of the most sacred and visited sites in Armenia primarily due to the legend of Saint Gregory the Illuminator who was imprisoned for 13 years in Khor Virap’s …

Urartian Seals: 8th–7th Century B.C.

Urartian Seals: 8th–7th Century B.C.

Urartu was one of several first-millennium B.C. states that came into existence and prominence in Armenian Highland after the destruction of the Hittite state around 1200 B.C. The earliest known Urartian written document, a rock inscription at Van (ancient Tushpa), records the earliest reference to the state. There it says that Urartu was ruled by …

April 23, Three Years After the Fall

April 23, Three Years After the Fall

“But if, violently or otherwise, the populace deposes a just king, or if, as more frequently happens, it tastes the blood of the aristocracy and subjects the entire state to its wild caprice (and make no mistake about it, no tempest or conflagration, however great, is harder to quell than a mob carried away by …

Trdat the Architect – World History Encyclopedia

Trdat the Architect - World History Encyclopedia

“Trdat the Architect” or Tiridates (c. 940s-c. 1020s?) was a Armenian architect who is noted for his role in the reconstruction of the Hagia Sophia‘s dome in Constantinople following an earthquake in the 10th century CE, as well as the Cathedral of Ani and the Church of Gagik in what is now present-day Turkey. Along with Momik (c.1270-1333 CE), Trdat is …