Mher Mkrtchyan – Hero of the Armenian Spirit

Mher Mkrtchyan – Hero

Chess Pawns. Mher Mkrtchyan liked to animate objects. Here is what he said about chess pawns: “When I look at pawns, when I think about their fate, by golly, I am reduced to tears. For a single soldier to reach the eighth horizontal, it is necessary that almost all the others sacrifice themselves. For the …

Traces of Machining on Ancient Granite in Armenia

Traces of Machining

Traces of processing very similar to machine processing were found on fragments of granite in a basalt fortress dating to the 2nd millennium BC on the Armavirablur hill in less than an hour drive from the capital of Armenia Yerevan. The basalt blocks themselves have been clearly processed manually. In contrast, the granite fragments seem …

Tsovinar – Legends of Ancient Armenia

Tsovinar – Legends of Ancient Armenia

In Armenian myths, Tsovinar or Tsovyan (“marine”) was the spirit of thunderstorm and the personification of lightning. Tsovinar was a wrathful woman galloping on a fiery horse in the clouds during thunderstorms. She sent people life-giving rain or deleterious hail. In the Armenian epos “Sasna Tsrer” (“Daredevils of Sasun”), Tsovinar was the mother of twins …

The Origins of Astronomical Knowledge – Petroglyphs of Armenia

The Origins of Astronomical Knowledge

One theory claims that the most ancient centers of astronomical knowledge were the territories of Armenia and Asia Minor. Prominent historians and astronomers concluded that people who divided the sky into constellations have lived between 36 and 42 degrees of northern latitude. According to English astronomer Olcott, people who invented the ancient figures of the …

Vishap in the Myths of Ancient Armenia

Vishap in the Myths of Ancient Armenia

Vishaps in Armenian mythology were dragons, chthonic creatures. They were represented in a zoomorphic (most often in the form of a snake) or anthropomorphic appearance and personified thunderstorms, tornadoes, or thunderclouds. According to myths, the big Vishap absorbed the sun, causing an eclipse. Vishaps lived in high mountains, in large lakes, in the sky, in …

Goddess Astghik – Legends of Ancient Armenia

Goddess Astghik – Legends of Ancient Armenia

In Armenian mythology, Astghik (“little star”) was the goddess of love and water and the beloved of god Vahagn. Her main temple in Ashtishat (north of the modern city of Mush in Western Armenia) was called the “bedroom of Vahagn.” Sometimes, the goddess of fertility, love, and water in Armenian pantheon was referred to as …

Mihr-Mher-Mithra – Pantheon of Ancient Armenia

Mihr-Mher-Mithra

Mihr-Mher-Mithra is a god of heavenly light and sun and the son of Aramazd in the ancient Armenian pantheon. In ancient Armenia, a temple in Bagaharij (in the territory of modern Turkey), the Mheri Dur altar (“the door of Mher”) in the mountains near the city of Van, and also, apparently, the Garni temple were …

The Armenian Community of Chile

The Armenian Community of Chile

The number of Armenians in Chile is 2000 people. This figure also includes members of mixed families which make up a significant part of the Armenian community of the country. The Armenian community in Chile can be called peculiar since over the years, the number of Armenians in Chile has not increased and instead remained …

Historical Miniatures of the Provinces of the Russian Empire – Where the Transcaucasian Tatars Lived in 1856

Historical Miniatures

Miniature number 1. The Derbent Governorate to the south of modern Dagestan and the north of modern Azerbaijan. The population was 116 thousand people and comprised of Georgians, Chechens, and Armenians. Tatars (current Azerbaijanis) are not mentioned – all highlanders are counted as Chechens. Miniature number 2. The Erivan Governorate, which is practically modern Armenia. …