Etchmiadzin Cathedral – The World History Encyclopedia

Etchmiadzin Cathedral - The World History Encyclopedia

The Etchmiadzin Cathedral (also spelled “Echmiatsin,” “Echmiadzin,” and “Edjmiadsin”) is located in the city of Etchmiadzin (also referred to as Vagharshapat), Armavir Province in what is now present-day Armenia. It is geographically situated near the fertile valley of the Aras River, and it is not too far away from Mount Ararat, Armenia’s capital, Yerevan, and Khor Virap Monastery. It is the spiritual center of …

A Crash Course in Armenian History

A Crash Course in Armenian History

The two days I spent in Yerevan, the Armenian capital, were Feb. 25 to 27, 2015. But it didn’t feel that way. Everything I did and everywhere I went seemed suffused with the past; my trip turned, unexpectedly and unintentionally, into a crash course in Armenian history. I ate and made friends and drank beer …

Nina Katchadourian’s Eccentric Existentialism

Nina Katchadourian’s Eccentric Existentialism

In her first show at Pace, an artist driven by curiosity and a penchant for the absurd tries to understand the world. The results are touching and sometimes hilarious. Nina Katchadourian is a sculptor, a printmaker, a photographer, a performance artist, a video artist, a sound artist — but more than any of those things she …

Erebuni – The World History Encyclopedia

Erebuni - The World History Encyclopedia

Erebuni was an Urartian fortress and city, located between the Nor Aresh District and the Vardahsen District on the outskirts of present-day Yerevan, Armenia, and situated on top of Arin Berd hill. In Armenian, the fortress and archaeological site is known as “Arin-Berd” or the “Fortress of Blood,” and the name of this fortress city endures in the …

Remembering the Armenian Genocide – The New York Times

Remembering the Armenian Genocide - The New York Times

Descendants of survivors — Turks and Armenians — share their families’ stories. ‘I Wish I Could Speak for Her’ My grandmother’s name was Pailadzou Tutunjian. She was born in Ada Bazar, Turkey, in 1894. She grew up on a farm and quit school to work. A wealthy Turkish family in Constantinople employed her before she …

Dance: Armenians Present Armenians

Dance: Armenians Present Armenians

About the Archive This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to …

Mesrop Mashtots – The World History Encyclopedia

Mesrop Mashtots - The World History Encyclopedia

Mesrop Mashtots (360/370 – c. 440 CE) invented the Armenian alphabet in 405 CE. Besides greatly increasing levels of literacy in the country, the language permitted ordinary people to read the Bible for the first time, thus helping to further spread and entrench Christianity in Armenia, which was the original intention behind the script‘s invention. For these achievements Mashtots (Mastoc) was made a saint …

From Wool to Elegant Carpets: The Smoothest Route Through Armenia

From Wool to Elegant Carpets: The Smoothest Route Through Armenia

Explore Armenia through its rich tapestry of textile production. In the summer of 2020, the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage’s My Armenia Program partnered with Armenian publication Yerevan Magazine to publish a special issue highlighting community-based cultural heritage tourism in the country. Over the next few months, the Center will publish English translations of the articles to Smithsonian Voices. During this difficult …

This Armenian Life – The New York Times

This Armenian Life - The New York Times

Greater Los Angeles is a collection of not just smaller cities but also exotic populations. Among those cities is Glendale (not so small: it would be the second-most-populous city in New England), a center of the Armenian diaspora and home to one of the world’s largest Armenian populations outside Armenia. Fleeing religious violence in the …

Byzantine-Armenian Relations – The World History Encyclopedia

Byzantine-Armenian Relations - The World History Encyclopedia

The relationship between the Byzantine Empire and ancient Armenia was a constant and varied one with an equal mix of wars, occupations, treaties of friendship, mutual military aid, and cultural exchange. Regarded as a vital defence to the Empire‘s eastern frontiers, emperors used various means of influence from outright takeover to gifts of titles and lands to Armenian nobles. Influence …

The Key to Armenia’s Survival

The Key to Armenia's Survival

VENICE — Armenian civilization is one of the most ancient of those surviving in the Middle East, but for large parts of its history Armenia has been a nation without a country. This has given the spoken and written word, the primary means through which Armenian identity has been preserved, enormous prominence in its people’s …

In Nagorno-Karabakh, Land Mines, Bulldozers and Lingering Tensions – The New York Times

In Nagorno-Karabakh, Land Mines, Bulldozers and Lingering Tensions - The New York Times

Despite the hurdles, territory seized by Azerbaijan from Armenia in last year’s war is being transformed with breathtaking speed. KELBAJAR, Azerbaijan — The medieval monastery walls are masked with camouflage netting. Machine-gun nests line the courtyard under a fluttering Russian flag. Cannons mounted on armored vehicles guard the mountainside where tour buses used to park. …

Harissa: Tradition and Resistance

Harissa: Tradition and Resistance

Food plays an important part in shaping identities, culture and society as a whole. In Armenia, everything has a legend or story attached to it, imparting a deeper meaning: our mountains, rivers and lakes, apricots and pomegranates, grapes and wine, and bread. All those legends and traditions come to define us as a nation and our …