Raising a Glass to Armenia’s Elaborate Toasting Tradition

Raising a Glass to Armenia’s Elaborate Toasting Tradition

In the backyard of the world’s oldest-known winery, a cherished national tradition evolved In Armenia, you learn quickly that “cheers” doesn’t cut it: Feasts among friends often entail elaborate ordered toasts sprinkled with poetry, religion, folk song and history. Armenians take toasts so seriously that they often nominate a tamadan (toastmaster) to hold court over, say, …

Geghard – World History Encyclopedia

Geghard - World History Encyclopedia

Geghard (Armenian: Geghardavank or “monastery of the spear”) is a medieval monastery located in Armenia‘s Kotayk province, deep within the Azat Valley, which was built directly out of an adjacent mountain. Geghard is renown throughout Armenia for its medieval art and architecture, and local traditions associate the site with Saint Gregory the Illuminator (c. 257 – c. 331 CE) who came to the area …

Armenian Alphabet in the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

Statues of Mesrop Mashtots – creator of Armenian Alphabet and Koriun – his pupil and biographer, erected in front of Matenadaran – anchient manuscripts depository. The Armenian Alphabet was invented in 405 AD by Armenian linguist, statesman and hymnologist Mesrop Mashtots. The language has 39 letters. The writing direction – left to right. The Armenian …

In pictures: to the anniversary of Armenian earthquake,BBC

In pictures: to the anniversary of Armenian earthquake,BBC

On 7 December 1988 a devastating earthquake in northern Armenia killed 25,000 and left hundreds of thousands homeless in the Soviet republic. The 6.8 magnitude quake affected an area 80km (50 miles) in diameter. Mikhail Gorbachev cancelled an official visit to the United States and toured the cities devastated by the earthquake. In a move …

Briefly about the Sasanian empire – World History Encyclopedia

Briefly about the Sasanian empire - World History Encyclopedia

The Sasanian Empire (224-651 CE, also given as Sassanian, Sasanid or Sassanid) was the last pre-Islamic Persian empire, established in 224 CE by Ardeshir I, son of Papak, descendant of Sasan. The Empire lasted until 651 CE when it was overthrown by the Arab Rashidun Caliphate. It is considered by the Iranian people to be a highlight of their civilization for, after the fall of the Achaemenid Empire (c. …

Explore an Ancient Cave City in Armenia

Explore an Ancient Cave City in Armenia

Residents lived in Old Khndzoresk up until the 1950s In a rural corner of southeastern Armenia, livestock walk in and out of rooms carved into the cliffside, grazing among the ancient rock-hewn homes of Old Khndzoresk, a multi-level village built into the volcanic rocks. Archaeological evidence suggests habitation of the excavated caves goes back over a …

Areni Cave – World History Encyclopedia

Areni Cave - World History Encyclopedia

The Areni Cave is a multicomponent cave site with artifacts dating from the Chalcolithic to the Bronze Age. In Armenia, the Areni Cave complex is also known as “Birds’ Cave” (“Trchuneri” in Armenian). Located near the town of Areni, which lies close to the Arpa River and the Gnishik River in Armenia’s central Vayots Dzor Province, the caves are …

Shamakhi: A Lost Dialect, a Lost Identity

Shamakhi: A Lost Dialect, a Lost Identity

Armenian has numerous regional dialects spoken within and outside the country. While the Armenian dialectal diversity is impressive, much of it is endangered. Language endangerment, a process gradually leading to language death, unless it is reversed is of interest not only for linguists. It is inevitably connected to the loss of cultural heritage encoded in …

Prunus Armeniaca “Armenian Plum”

Prunus Armeniaca “Armenian Plum”

Prunus armeniaca (“Armenian plum”), the most commonly cultivated apricot species, also called ansu apricot, Siberian apricot, Tibetan apricot, is a species of Prunus, classified with the plum in the subgenus Prunus. The native range is somewhat uncertain due to its extensive prehistoric cultivation. A disputed origin The origin of the species is disputed. It was …

How Ancient Volcanoes Created Armenia’s Pink City

How Ancient Volcanoes Created Armenia’s Pink City

In the capital city of Yerevan, volcanic rock flows pink As you approach the Armenian capital of Yerevan, you can look up and see Mount Ararat towering in the distance, casting its shadow on a city shrouded in pink. Yerevan has come to be known as Armenia’s Pink City for exactly this view: its Soviet-era buildings …

Why Does Azerbaijan Use Jihadist Mercenaries?

Why Does Azerbaijan Use Jihadist Mercenaries?

There is now abundant evidence that Azerbaijan is using Syrian jihadist mercenaries transported by Turkey from the areas it controls in Syria to fight against Armenians in Artsakh. The question is why Azerbaijan, a majority-Muslim but ostensibly secular country run by dictator Ilham Aliyev on shaky footing, would want to have jihadists in his country. …

Hayasa-Azzi – World History Encyclopedia

Hayasa-Azzi - World History Encyclopedia

The Hayasa-Azzi were an indigenous Bronze Age tribal confederation which flourished on the plateau of ancient Armenia and eastern Anatolia (on the Armenian highlands note by ArtATsolum) between c. 1500 and c. 1200 BCE. Although the historical record is impoverished and disputed regarding the region at this time, it is known that they were enemies of the powerful Hittites further to the east, were probably …

Iron Ladle by Khrimyan Hayrig

Iron Ladle by Khrimyan Hayrig

Before revolutionaries, there was Hayrig. Mkrtich Khrimyan, known by the diminutive Hayrig, was a patriotic leader in the 19th century. Though a clergyman, he made no secret of his nationalism and was even made to resign his position as Patriarch of Constantinople. Before being chosen to serve as Catholicos and thus returning to the clergy, …

Can Ancient Techniques Make Modern Wine Better?

Can Ancient Techniques Make Modern Wine Better?

A new generation of wineries are going to painstaking lengths to acquire hundreds of historic clay karases After a bit of searching, my driver and I arrive at our destination: Rind, a remote village on Armenia’s western border. Modest residences are strung together along its bumpy, dirt roads. The little community seemingly in the middle …