Category «History»

In pictures: to the anniversary of Armenian earthquake,BBC

In pictures: to the anniversary of Armenian earthquake,BBC

On 7 December 1988 a devastating earthquake in northern Armenia killed 25,000 and left hundreds of thousands homeless in the Soviet republic. The 6.8 magnitude quake affected an area 80km (50 miles) in diameter. Mikhail Gorbachev cancelled an official visit to the United States and toured the cities devastated by the earthquake. In a move …

Briefly about the Sasanian empire – World History Encyclopedia

Briefly about the Sasanian empire - World History Encyclopedia

The Sasanian Empire (224-651 CE, also given as Sassanian, Sasanid or Sassanid) was the last pre-Islamic Persian empire, established in 224 CE by Ardeshir I, son of Papak, descendant of Sasan. The Empire lasted until 651 CE when it was overthrown by the Arab Rashidun Caliphate. It is considered by the Iranian people to be a highlight of their civilization for, after the fall of the Achaemenid Empire (c. …

Shamakhi: A Lost Dialect, a Lost Identity

Shamakhi: A Lost Dialect, a Lost Identity

Armenian has numerous regional dialects spoken within and outside the country. While the Armenian dialectal diversity is impressive, much of it is endangered. Language endangerment, a process gradually leading to language death, unless it is reversed is of interest not only for linguists. It is inevitably connected to the loss of cultural heritage encoded in …

A pilgrimage to Calcutta recalls Armenian history

A pilgrimage to Calcutta recalls Armenian history

CALCUTTA — Before there were call centers and Indian conglomerates, before the East India Co. or the British Raj, there were Armenians who made their way to India to trade and to escape religious persecution from the Turks and, later, Persians. Entrepreneurial and devout Christians, but familiar with the Islamic ways of Mughal emperors, Armenians arrived …

Teishebaini – World History Encyclopedia

Teishebaini - World History Encyclopedia

Teishebaini (aka Tesebaini, modern Karmir-Blur, near Yerevan, Armenia) was an important fortress city of the Urartu civilization and excavations at the site, largely undisturbed since its abandonment c. 590 BCE, have provided an invaluable insight into the daily life of the region during the Bronze and Iron age of the 9th to 6th century BCE. With huge walls, large storerooms, granaries, wine and beer vats, along with …

Roman Emperor Nero Crowned Tiridates I Of Armenia

Roman Emperor Nero Crowned Tiridates I Of Armenia

Tiridates I was the King of Armenia beginning in 53 AD and the founder of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia. He reigned from 52-58 AD, then again from 62-88 AD. The coronation of Tiridates I of Armenia In 66 AD, the Armenian king Tiridates, who had been unable to overcome Roman and homegrown resistance in …

Why Did The Mongols Invade Armenia?

Why Did The Mongols Invade Armenia?

Throughout history, Armenia has seen periods of absolute independence but it has also been invaded by many peoples, such as the Parthians, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Mongols and Turkic tribes. The Mongol  Empire existed during the 13th and 14th centuries and was the largest contiguous land empire in history. At some point in the 13th century, …

The Queens of Urartu – Queens of Armenia

The Queens of Urartu - Queens of Armenia

History, especially ancient & medieval, usually chose men to be its heroes. Women tend to be held in the background. Armenian history is not any different in that respect, even though there are records of women playing a significant part. Because Armenia for a majority of its existence has been ruled by kings,  history has …

Khor Virap – World History Encyclopedia

Khor Virap - World History Encyclopedia

Khor Virap is a monastery located in Armenia that was first established in 642 CE. Its name is derived from “virap nerk’in,” which means “deep dungeon” in Armenian. Khor Virap is one of the most sacred and visited sites in Armenia primarily due to the legend of Saint Gregory the Illuminator who was imprisoned for 13 years in Khor Virap’s …

April 23, Three Years After the Fall

April 23, Three Years After the Fall

“But if, violently or otherwise, the populace deposes a just king, or if, as more frequently happens, it tastes the blood of the aristocracy and subjects the entire state to its wild caprice (and make no mistake about it, no tempest or conflagration, however great, is harder to quell than a mob carried away by …

Trdat the Architect – World History Encyclopedia

Trdat the Architect - World History Encyclopedia

“Trdat the Architect” or Tiridates (c. 940s-c. 1020s?) was a Armenian architect who is noted for his role in the reconstruction of the Hagia Sophia‘s dome in Constantinople following an earthquake in the 10th century CE, as well as the Cathedral of Ani and the Church of Gagik in what is now present-day Turkey. Along with Momik (c.1270-1333 CE), Trdat is …

A Crash Course in Armenian History

A Crash Course in Armenian History

The two days I spent in Yerevan, the Armenian capital, were Feb. 25 to 27, 2015. But it didn’t feel that way. Everything I did and everywhere I went seemed suffused with the past; my trip turned, unexpectedly and unintentionally, into a crash course in Armenian history. I ate and made friends and drank beer …

Remembering the Armenian Genocide – The New York Times

Remembering the Armenian Genocide - The New York Times

Descendants of survivors — Turks and Armenians — share their families’ stories. ‘I Wish I Could Speak for Her’ My grandmother’s name was Pailadzou Tutunjian. She was born in Ada Bazar, Turkey, in 1894. She grew up on a farm and quit school to work. A wealthy Turkish family in Constantinople employed her before she …

Dance: Armenians Present Armenians

Dance: Armenians Present Armenians

About the Archive This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them. Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to …

Mesrop Mashtots – The World History Encyclopedia

Mesrop Mashtots - The World History Encyclopedia

Mesrop Mashtots (360/370 – c. 440 CE) invented the Armenian alphabet in 405 CE. Besides greatly increasing levels of literacy in the country, the language permitted ordinary people to read the Bible for the first time, thus helping to further spread and entrench Christianity in Armenia, which was the original intention behind the script‘s invention. For these achievements Mashtots (Mastoc) was made a saint …