The Armenian Language, The Foundation of The Indo-European Languages

The Armenian LanguageAmerican researcher and historian Robert Drews in his book The Coming of the Greeks: Indo-European Conquests in the Aegean Sea and the Near East wrote, that the Greek civilization or its “prototype” indeed came out of the cradle of the civilization of the Armenian Highlands. Initially they settled in central and western Asia Minor, namely in the area around Troy. That time period was later marked by the so-called Dorian invasion.

The efforts of German businessman and pioneer in the field of archeology Heinrich Schliemann in the search for Troy have been successful and became a base for confirmation of correctness of the conclusions of the scientists who investigated this issue.

Besides, there have been some linguistic adoptions. For example, the Greek word aristocracy was derived from Armenian ar or ari, which means, among other things, belonging to a noble family or ruling class.

This suggests that when the bearers of the Armenian language and culture settled in the region the Greeks might have borrowed the concept from them, and later began to call the representatives of the upper class of society aristocrats.

The Greek word aristocrat is formed from Ancient Greek áristos (best) and krátos (rule). So, the word aristocrat denoted aristocracy, nobility, or people of rank in a community; one of a ruling class.

Another word for consideration is the word Sunday. In Greek the corresponding word is pronounced as kiryeki, and in Armenian as kiraki. In Armenian the etymology of the word is connected with fire and the Sun, considered to be the symbols of the first day of the week. K(i)raki from Armenian is translated literally as of fire (thus, kiraki means day of fire). That’s why Georgians called Armenians Su or Somekh (People of the Sun).

That means that the Armenian language might be a key element for deciphering the history of the Indo-European peoples and their languages which have been possibly arisen on the basis of the Armenian language and the mythology of Armenia.


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